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be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jonathan pershing, t
in the fields of engineering, science, and math -- you dig, the numbers are fairly is stunning. -- fairly stunning. roughly 44% of graduates are in those skills. europe is at 24%. i say this respectfully, and i know we are on c-span. when the your pants -- the europeans are outpacing us, in these key fields that will drive innovation, then you know we are in trouble. i would correct one comment. there have been at some of us, chris coons and marco rubio, we have put forward legislation long before the election that said, let's look at this talent competition issue. let's put forward an approach that many of us, those of us that have been from the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science and engineering or math graduates, native-born americans, particularly focusing on losing the numbers in middle school where girls and children of college had enormous challenges, that is something we will have to come back to. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways tha
. and for those who are unfamiliar with the term "stem" it stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. the hard sciences that we have too few in terms of graduates from our colleges and universities. this bill passed in the house of representatives with 245 votes, and was originally sponsored by my friend and colleague, lamar smith of texas, and is very similar to a piece of legislation i myself have introduced earlier this year. the goal of this legislation is one that i think is -- enjoys broad bipartisan support, and that is to help the united states retain more of the highly skilled immigrants who come to study at our colleges and universities. in particular, this bill would make eligible for a green card those who graduate in the stem fields who get a master's degree or a ph.d. and so we would not add to the net number of green cards that would be eligible, there is 55,000 diversity lottery visa green cards that would be substituted for by these stem green cards. now, we all know that america's immigration system is broken, and, unfortunately, it's a self-inflicted wound in many
do you reconcile what science has established what what you may think your faith teaches. when it comes to the age of the earth, there is no conflict. god created the heavens and the earth and scientific advances has given us insight. but i believe he has done it. and i have reconciled that. but other people have a deeper thought. in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe and that means teaching them science. but also parents have the right to teach them theology and reconcile those two things as they see fit. that's the point the president was making back in 2007. so that's what i was saying. >> accepting that context, household is the earth? >> -- how old is the fourth, four and a half billion years old. god created it out of nothing. and science has given us insight as to how and when he did it. and the more science learns the more i'm convinced that god is real. >> you have had a very fascinating faith journey. you were baptized catholic and mormon and later to the catholic church. >> maybe i'm a theologian. and you go to mass an
. these are actually very exciting and challenging times. the science that prevention works, that treatment is effective, and that people do in fact recover continues to grow. we've achieved parity and equity in law, or at least we've achieved the law-workin' on the implementation. now it's time to achieve a quality in service. since day one, this administration has been focused on applying sound, research-based drug policies geared toward protecting americans from the threats that drugs pose to public health and safety. i spent my entire career in law enforcement. i know we can't arrest our way out of our drug problem, and that's why our policies are based on the recognition that drug addiction is a disease, that it can be successfully prevented, and it can be treated. and simply put, the tragic wreckage wrought by drug use can be prevented before it becomes a criminal justice or a public health emergency. i stand here today as a living example that a better life is possible. i realize that in grace and wellness could lead me to improved mental health and physical health. as recently as 4
. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out pres
science, and they've waged an all-out attack on clean air laws of the. the top 25 senators who have received the most campaign cash from from, seven sitting here today on the environmental public works committees and big surprise. they are all republicans and they have all voted in favor of oil interests. john barasso, jim inhoff and lamar alexander have voted for fossil fuels 94% of the time. the koch brothers have given $60 million to groups that fund climate denial research including senator jim demint's new home the heritage foundation. right now, halfway across the world in doha qatar, world leaders are meeting for climate talks. according to a new report the koch's influence is being felt there as well. coming to us via skype from doha qatar, where it's the middle of the night is victor minadi, the executive director that did that report the international forum on globalization. victor, welcome inside "the war room"? >> hi. thanks for having me. >> you bet. thanks for staying up to bring the news to us. we heard what the koch brothers hav
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. let's find out if we have got anything wrong so far. for that we go to tv's andy levy. joy do you have your -- >> do you have your bus there? >> it is my cat. >> i don't think so. >> it is my cat. >> it is a bus. >> i see a cat. >> i believe you do. >> i do. i see a cat. >> i don't think you are lying. >> i wonder what your cats look like, andy? >> not like that. >> i'm afraid. >> and you will never find out. students pushing for divest meant. ambassador, you said if they don't like endowments, let them pay a higher tuition. okay, i agree. but let me be a little con terror yen. contrarian, aren't colleges supposed to do things like this? >> from you asking if they are supposed to act in an immature way, then yes, it fits into that. >> all right. >> that's it? >> i just feel like maybe in college you are supposed to do things like this. >> it is a possibility. >> you know by saying this -- >> we will get to that later. >> andy happened to do the
, in the chemical laboratory, in the health science room, they broke a vial that had some of it in it. they evacuated that school. the fire department came in with all kinds of equipment to make sure they were not exposed to it. women who are pregnant, they say don't eat fish that has mercury in it and they cautioned them, the that there is surgeonfish you can eat. there are all kinds of reasons not to be exposed to mercury. yet we continue to put it in vaccinations as a preservative. in 1929, they came up with for marisol. they tested it on 29 people who had meningitis. they all died of meningitis, but the the mercury in the vaccination was not a contributing factor. so since 1929, it has never been completely tested and they continue to use it in vaccinations. it was not so bad when wenchow got a vaccination or two or three. but now they -- when one child got a vaccination or two or three. but now they get 29. the brain tissues to not -- it stays in there and it causes severe problems. during my chairmanship, for six years, we had four years of hearings. we had people from all of th
-- it is like a science filmstrip. >> we were saying that for some reason, it is always such great timing politically because the republicans inevitably are acting like jerks at christmastime. here we go with the fiscal cliff and the debt and now they vote down the disabilities act right in front of bob dole in a real wheelchair. we're just like wow. >> absolutely. if anyone wants to make a music video using this song as the background alluding to all of that stuff you're talking about you know, i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: there you go. >> i can't speak for viacom's lawyers. >> stephanie: no. >> but i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: here's a fun fact. co-wrote ten of the album songs. who is so handsome and rowic and talented. >> thank you. >> don't be a jerk dates from 2009. the joe wilson thing was happening. it just seemed like rudeness and you know, the lack of manners and civil discourses breaking down. you know, my cowriter, andy and i came up with this phrase, how about a song don't be a
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine woe ho ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ ♪ hey, all right now ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good ♪ >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. six minutes after the hour. 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. charlie pierce from esquire.com coming up at the bottom of the hour. sexyliberal.com the sexy liberal website, sexy liberal on facebook, get tickets. d.c. sexy liberal show january 19th. there are only five vip tickets left now. >> as of 15 minutes ago there were two left. >> stephanie: oh dear. i think three quarters of the orchestra already gone, so hurry. we have been talking about the fiscal cliff, it is like we can just dial back to last summer and yet what has hand since this then [♪ "jeopardy" theme music ♪] >>
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, , ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. at your local music is a universal langue. but when i was in an accident. i was worried the health care system spoke a language all i own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. d tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million ericans. that's health in numbebers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ >> all right. we've got the adp report on private sector employment. only 118,000 jobs created in november. that's in the the private sector, okay? however, clearly that was affected by the big storm, sa y sandy. should have been much higher and will have been much higher w
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
ahead. >> reporter: this political science professor at uw called this an interesting bind for the president, saying my crens is they will look the other way, but find a couple high profile people who are well beyond the bounds of our new law and bust them, but leave everyone else completely alone. if that happens, the target could be on frank snarr, but he thinks he's just the first and more private smoking rooms will soon pop up. >> and more power to them. if they can raise revenue for the state, that's what it's all about. that's what we're in business for. >> now, the bar owner stresses the buying or selling of marijuana inside his club is strictly prohibited. >>> well, still ahead this morning, as fighting continues in syria, a new move by rebel forces to improve coordination could bring on support from the united states. >> and in london, more backlash over the death of a nurse who fell victim to a radio show prank. find out what people are saying the radio host should do now. we'll be right back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all.
and science and technology. >> yeah, absolutely. that's one of the big things is we want to show how to do science and engineering on the show and we want to make it fun. a lot of this science shows, ten minute noose them, you fall asleep or whatever. that's one of the reasons we blow stuff up, we launch rockets, because we've got to get this next generation of kids interested in doing science engineering and math. >> brian: i still can't get through a whole episode of "electric company." steve, you remember we got in trouble for saying red neck on television? >> steve: right. >> brian: we got written up how numb we were to the people in the south. you're saying red neck is misunderstood. >> completely misunderstood. look up the history of the word. nowhere in its history was it used as derogatory term. it's only been in the last few decades that that's used on tv. in the south, it really is a term of endearment, if you think about it. it's hard work sharecroppers who had to be resourceful. everything they had was on the farm. if something broke, they had to fix it. when we moved the germa
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ >> greg: last week, i went on a tour to promote my book "the joy of hate" which took me from florida, to alabama, and georgia. to tennessee. some call this the south with sarcasm. a buddy of mine gave me flick "deliverance" to watch as a joke. but i freaked out, large crowds with mom for daughters and sons for dads. dads for daughters. so many brought food from pumpkin bread to moonshine. that nearly killed me. more unicorns to shake a horn at. each place i went fan of the five turned on by a parent or their child. this was shared activity, the "the five," "red eye requests ants fnc, key place for families to commiserate. most is over their hatred of jasper. that makes them intelligent. but something is going on here. you fair food and everything. a stranger offered to take our orders and never heard or seen from again. new yorkers will mock this. the stupid rubs. but this is the only culture we have left as we barrel down identity politics and victim measure victor. only place left that everyone is the same is here. as
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. ♪ ♪ >> bob: the most wonderful time of the year in more ways than one. last night was one of the great days that happens in america every year. the annual victoria secret fashion show. roll the tape. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> bob: okay. now among other things they had, they showed a $2.5 million bra. the diamond studded one. you ever want to wear one of those? >> kimberly: i got one of those. came with a free tote bag. >> bob: did it? >> kimberly: no. >> bob: maybe fashion conscious, what are the wings for? >> kimberly: that is just because angels, baby. >> greg: this is outrageous they would be wearing wings. >> dana: they should call it victorious -- victoria secret christmas show and then everybody would turn against the atheists. >> bob: this one of the biggest nights -- this started out as
for those living near the coast. bill nye the science guy is going the break it down. you're watching msnbc, the place for politics. ♪ begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. the most common side effect is lo
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
the girl offcampus and then snuck a bow and error into this father's science classroom and before the students he shot his father in the head with an arrow and then shot himself. investigators are not sure what led to murders. >> cargo ships diverted because of a sport strike in l.a. are headed to oakland. the strike ban tuesday. clerical workers walked off the job and the long shoremen joined them. the the works say the port wants to move their jobs overseas, and the port says that is not true. the strike could cost the ports billions in business. it's not clear if the ships headed to oakland will unload there. >> the world's first nuclear powered aircraft carrier has been taken out of active service. thousands of people said goodbye to the uss enterprise which was deactivated in virginia today. it's seen action in every major conflict since the cuban missile crisis. the military will remove its nuclear fuel and then scrap it for parts. >> ahead, making the holidays special for those in need. an effort kicks off to provide toys to some 3,000 bay area children this holiday season.
. >>> in casper, wyoming police say a computer science instructor whose son killed him at a community college yesterday showed courage's instructed his students to leave the room while he fended off his son. police say earlier in the day the young are krumm stabbed to death his father's girlfriend. krumm had no significant history of encounters with police an oregon man is recovering after being bitten by a shark while snorkeling in maui. >> you have to look at this while the emt told me on the way here, you could have had this or been struck by lightning, the odds about the same. >> 691-year-old says he was 250 yards over shore what the shark attacked him yesterday. kennedy says the shark let go and he swam as fast as he could to his paddleboard to get help. this is the fourth shark attack off maui since october. officials closed off a two-mile section of beaches a precaution. >>> saying goodbye to a legendary fighter. the way fans remembered the boxer hector camacho as he was laid to rest. >>> a tunnel collapses on a what are you doing there? i am making crescent bacon cheddar pinwheels.
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: and in the impact segment tonight, we continue our analysis on the murder suicide in kansas city with an emphasis on the excuse culture here now monica crowley and alan colmes. do you accept the premise we are living in a country that accept bracing excuse-making? >> i think in many cases that's true. >> bill: whoa. medic? [ laughter ] do we have somebody? >> i am here to give you that reaction. >> bill: i'm glad. >> i think it's true. what you said is accurate in that it is personal responsibility. >> bill: yep. >> it rests with him. >> bill: why do you think colmes a guy like bob costas. i talked to him today. it's very interesting and i hope you tune in tomorrow to see him. it's not what you think it is. why do you think that his commentary which is the most powerful and widely watched of anybody, all right? didn't zero in on personal responsibility and, instead, went into the gun culture? >> i can't speak for him. >> bill: why do you think he did it. >> he probably does feel that what whitlock said resonated that
there is no science base to this. who are we supposed to believe? nasa who has been around since 1958 or the myans at least a couple years before that. >> which myan is claiming that? >> he is bob myan on 53rd and eighth and carrying signs for two months. >> have you ever seen "deep impact"? >> no, i think i know what it feels like though. >> this is my kind of girl. what are you doing later? >> nothing. or someone or something. >> we will talk. my number is 917. >> are you aware of what happens on december 21st? >> i love you. you are awesome. >> do you want me to interview you? >> happy hanukkah, happy kwanza. >> celebrate all. >> do your faith and belief correlate with the great opportunity to get laid? >> it is always a great opportunity. >> not for me. have i been trying all day and this whole thing does not work. >> finally somebody gets it. you know how i know they get it? the 2013 glasses are on rebate for $4.99 each. way to go guys. now i am going in to rob something. >> why do so many people put faith in this ancient calendar? >> i have never understood. i guess they were good at predict
... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rket science. it's just t common sense. from td ameritre. liz: here we go, two minutes before the closing bell, let's go tony -- tomy -- nicole. stocks seeing a bit of a bump ahead of results with a ton of shorts biting their nails over this one. >> it's an interesting one. pandora's a winner, and the question is whether or not they increase the revenue. people are betting yes. david: i'm david asman, there's nicole. netflix, seeing a big pop today. they signed a deal with disney. apparently, investors think it's profitable. >> it is a big deal here because what you can do is they will exclusively distribute disney movies through television in 20 # 16 when the current deal expires with stars channel. it's a big deal. liz: what happened with gap, and there were comments from analysts, we know that, but this is a stock that's done just beautifully over the past year or so, and, today, it took that. >> we saw over a hundred companies rushing to pay dividends, but the gap is passing on the payout to the shareholder, and they a
tara wall was a senior media adviser for. an associate professor of science at columbia university. a fellow at the roosevelt institute and manuel reyes. thanks for having you here. it's nice to have you. >>> tara, welcome to nerdland. >> how did i know you were coming to me first. >> now i would like you to explain your party. >> lay it all on the table. >> in a certain way, it's so early, i feel silly talking about it. but i do think it's important that we not sort of come out of a win as i've seen both parties do in midterm elections or general elections with this narrative, oh, the other party is over. this is the decisive election. i don't think we see anything like that. when you look at the new herd, what seems to you like the things that are different? >> i think, number one, there are a couple of things. i think as you mentioned, it is a little more diverse, both ethnically and sexwise. i mean, you have a few more women which i think is great. i think after any election, everybody does recalibrating and lessons learned. i think what you don't want to lose sight of is the f
. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done. what it free men and women can achieve when imagination joins a common purpose. host: his inaugural address from january 2009. the question is, as the president moves to a second term, what is your number one priority? the number one agenda item you think he needs to address? danny is joining us from west virginia on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the first issue and the core of all of our problems is the free trade we have been engaging in for the last 20 years. if you look at the jobs numbers and how long it takes to recover from the sessions, the clear issue is our jobs have
first. that's at stake here. >> michael is talking about some sort of political science version of the way a negotiation should take place. >> no. >> what happened in the last election is that republicans ran on this position where they were beating the hell out of democrats for cutting medicare. i mean ryan -- with the ryan/romney ads were downright hypocritical and the president has greater political strength coming out of this and he's got his own plan and he's been specific on his own terms and i think when geithner sits around uttering the same talking point over and over again about tell us what you're talking about, i think it's a fair thing to do. i think the president has a political strength right now to force the republicans to offer their own very unpopular -- >> we'll see. that's what's going to get played out over the next few weeks. >> it's chicken. >> he has more leverage. doesn't have all the leverage. >> he sass some. >> he's coming out strong. >> what leverage do the republicans -- i mean yes, they have some. >> they control the house. >> yes. >> that is the f
, this is not rocket science. that piece is very easy to -- >> but once you do that, why don't you admit you're not -- you're going to let the top rates go back to 39.6%. >> you can do that but this is the kicker. the republicans want to see that they're actually going to get something in the bargain that's going to be real and genuine, not the promise for cuts in entitlement spending four or five kongss from now but in the next -- >> let's talk turkey. everybody on the o shows do it their way. i want to do it a certain way. >> of course. >> of course. sarcasm won't stop you, might not have you back here again. i'm just kidding. you're invaluable. let's go with this thing. during the cuban missile crisis kennedy and khrushchev were communicating through different ways. kennedy was trying to communicate i will do it this way, this won't work for you stick, this will work for you. so they found ways to communicate. is there a communication going on head to head between the president and the speaker right now? >> as of -- >> are they thinking back and forth? >> as of last wednesday they spoke o
, the academy the arts and science and lincoln high school. >>> inmates in the south bay are using their woodworking skills to put smiles on kids' faces this holiday season. the santa clara county sheriff's office and the department of corrections donated 350 toys to the toys for tots program and they were all made by elmwood facility inmates in milpitas. they range from a car to those rocking horses. >> definitely i would love to have kids see that i have put, you know, toys together for them and, you know, just good seeing those things go out to them. >> over the last 12 years, elmwood inmates have made more than 3,000 toys for children. >>> and coming up in our next half hour, emergency services on the chopping block. the bay area city that could lose its only fire station. >> on the 8th day of the port strike in southern california, new action to try to put an end to it. >> he's making cynical comments, like filthy comments. >> then the target worker got hit by a comedian the other slap in the face just hours after the video surfaced. when i take a picture of this check, it go
... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. n you take a closer look.... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. x- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing. it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. that makes watching tv even better. if your tv were a hot dog, zeebox would be some sort of fancy, french musta
we have a more sort of science based and intellectually based argument about, you know, the harmful environmental effects versus the economic benefits and come up with the stuff chris is talking about the disclosure on how it's done. there has to be a mechanism of how to do that. >> a lot is behind the curtain of proprietary information. the second thing about the economic benefits of this, mine one is, it's driving down the cost of electricity and it's killing the coal industry from my perspective someone primarily cared about the climate, that's great. coal is a nasty substance. it's bad for people's lungs, bad for the climate, et cetera. driving costs so low it's crowding out renewables. this other effect that can be bad. in terms of jobs, we have the highest levels of employment in natural gas and oil extraction since 1992. the total jobs in extraction 200,000. not creating a lot of jobs in the industry. >> you're going to have more on your show this weekend, my friend. >> tomorrow. >> a little tease. >> tomorrow there's going to be an in depth conversation of fracking. >> and i
? >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern but a lot of curiosity. >> yeah, it was going so fast, it actually gets through the atmosphere, that makes the flow. >> reporter: the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. fit meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail? did it actually move? did it change color? did it move from east to west? >> reporter: a lot of scientists searching for explanation to what's called the fireball over texas, a lot of people who aren't scientists as well. >> i've heard so many different things about, you know, 2012. so it's kind of scary because it's getting closer to that day. >> a nasa expert says it may have been a meteor. national weather service says it was probably just space junk. there you go. >>> his architectural masterpieces speak for themselves. oscar niedermayer's spread across the country of brazil. next why his legacy will go on long after his death. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to work here in americ
'm like flash? should i be concerned. >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern, but a lot of curiosity. >> it's going so fast it actually gets through the atmosphere. >> the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. if it meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail, did it actually move, did it change color, did it move from east to west? >> reporter: a lot of scientists searching for an explanation of what's called the fireball over texas. a lot of people who aren't scientists as well. >> i have heard different things about 2012, so it's kind of scary because it's getting closer to that day. >> that was debra wrigley reporting. nasa has since cleared up the confusion. the flash was a meteor. coincidentally a meteor shower is expected to begin later this week. >>> are you on a job hunt or maybe you know someone who is? what if you could train on the job right from home? that's coming up. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its ow
chief science correspondence robert bazel has the story. >> reporter: with the season starting early, children's hospital in memphis is feeling the first wave. >> we've seen more than 200 cases of flu in the hospital this week and we're admitting eight to ten kids a day. we expect it to accelerate, to get worse before it gets better in the next few weeks. >> reporter: schoolchildren are not only vulnerable, they play a big role in spreading the flu. >> when you have all those kids getting together, they tend to pass the virus back and forth, they all get sick in the school and bring it home into the community. >> the way to protect those people is to vaccinate the people around them. so vaccinating more children reduces the risk of older people in the community of getting the flu. >> reporter: health officials are urging everyone, adults and children over 6 months old, to get vaccinated, and officials emphasized there's plenty to go around and it's never too late to get it. for "today," robert bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next on "today," hear why one washington lawmakers wants
... or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "power lunch." i'm courtney reagan with a quick "market flash" for you. we want to take a look at shares of apple. we've been watching them very closely. it now appears we are at that death cross. that means with today's decline, apple's 50-day moving average is now below the 200-day moving average. apple's shares down 2.6%. >>> ibm drawing fire over its plan to overhaul its 401(k) program. the "wall street journal" says ibm now plans to contribute a lump sum once a year payment, end of the year, to employee accounts instead of making those contributions twice a month. if other companies follow suit it could have huge implications for investors. joining me now to discuss this, bob pisani and john carney of cnbc. gentlemen, welcome. bob, i get how this is not helpful to workers. you lose the benefits of any dollar cost averaging. you may be ending up getting a lump sum at the end of the year. and if you leave the company before the end of the ye
an impact on brain function. as science and medicine progressed, society has come to understand mental illness with clarity. senator conrad and crapo wanted to strike the word lunatic from the united states code. i thank them for their effort and i encourage my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill to modernize or codified law to reflect the 21st century understanding of mental illness. and i reserve the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: this bill eliminates outdated references in the u.s. code that stigmatize individuals with mental illness. this legislation easily passed the senate with strong bipartisan support. the bill eliminates the word lunatic from the -- several sections of the united states code in order for our code to reflect meanings which are much more appropriate and up to date in the 21st century. in the past members of congress on both sides of the aisle have worked
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
including the institute of medicine of the national academy of sciences that has looked at this and there is no connection. host: north carolina. republican line. you are on, sir. caller: this is gary. are there flu shots you could take that do not have egg? i am allergic. host: -- host: dr. frieden? guest: most reactions to eggs are not actual the other's reactions. and this to develop hives or have trouble breathing, you should not worry. host: democrats line. laura. caller: i'm a 49-year-old african american. back in the day my parents used to give me this thing called father john. they made sure they gave us our vaccination, however i have learned that bad stuff builds up in -- that stuff buildup in the immune system. i also take cod liver oil. my daughter thinks that is the worst stuff, but she has never had the flu. i think sometimes we forget there were things we did not have in the past, and the things that people were taking to keep people alive, and just with the air we breathed now, it is dangerous. people could reflect on some of the things that old people ta
change between natural gas and coal is still somewhat a question mark. it looks based on most science we have now cleaner than coal, but we just don't know. we don't know a lot about the local impacts and how long these prices stay low or how long the wells last. there's a lot wi don't know about it, and it's moving so quickly. i think that's why you see a lot of of this. >> there's a lot of fear. >> and you're someone who is familiar with this. you live in upstate. you consulted for the oil and gas industry and you're a toxicologist, right? what are the fears you hear, and what's yue feeling about how people are understanding the process? >> people are not understanding the process at at all. the information is out there. the industry has been doing this for a while. they have the information, but the problem is a lot of people don't believe what the industry says. so even if the industry -- >> which is not ridiculous. let me just say it for the record, right? this is just as a basic kind of -- i think you're right. what ends up happening is you get this debate, right? the natural gas c
income and if you don't have income you can't pay income taxes. that's not rocket science. got to get folks back to work and more, mr. speaker. if you're a family of four and you're earning $30,000 a year, you can't afford to pay the bills of this country in the same way that someone making $200,000 a year can. that's ok. we understand that. that's why there are graduated rates in the income tax code. some people 10%. some people pay 15%. some people pay 25%. some people pay in the 30's. the more you have the more we think you're able to contribute, but here we are in what every american economist would agree is one of the most dire economic circumstances of our time and what i hear described as leadership from the president is don't change anything for the 80%. in fact, spend more on the 80% and go tap that last 1% to pay all the bills. the top 1% are already paying all the bills. . this chart i would say demonstrates a moral imperative that we have the and grapple with as american citizens, as members of the greatest self-ruling nation the history of the world, what we have already
and indicted it will never exonerate you. it's considered inadmissible, it's considered junk science. i would advice those kids not to take it. i would go a step further with the mother. i'd tell her to start naming names. if she has specific individuals who she feels are holding things back, like tamara pointed back, they may or may not be and they don't have an obligation to reveal it put some social paper on those individual, put their names in the letter, put it out there publicly. >> that is a risky thing to do. now you're risking opening yourself up to liability or defamation if you name people that are potentially involved in a crime and it didn't occur. martha: i think back to natalee holloway and her mother and how strong here she felt that that young man, joran van der sloot knew what happened, and the people who were with them had more information than they were giving. as a parent it's impossible to imagine when you know that all these people were with her. they went to a bar together, they might know a little bit about who else was there. i have to believe, keith, that these poli
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